UC San Diego SearchMenu
PLING

Principal Investigator

Terry Jernigan, Ph.D.

Pediatric Longitudinal Imaging, Neurocognition, and Genetics Study Investigator List

Natacha Akshoomoff
Sarah L. Archibald
Jan Atkinson
Caitlyn A. Azama
Hauke Bartsch
Oliver J. Braddick
Timothy T. Brown
Lauren B. Curley
Anders M. Dale
Sarah C. Dowling
Marybel Robledo Gonzalez
Donald J. Hagler, Jr.
John R. Iversen
Terry L. Jernigan
Joshua M. Kuperman
Kevin R. Lou
Melanie Maddox
Connor McCabe
Erik Newman
Joan Stiles
Wesley K. Thompson
Richard Tibbles

Summary

As parents know, the ages of children’s growth spurts differ a lot – even kids who end up about the same height when adults will leapfrog over each other at different ages. But do children’s minds and brains develop on different timetables as well?  And if so, what are the implications of these differences for their mental and academic development. This project will use magnetic resonance imaging to determine how much healthy children differ from each other in the rate at which their brains develop biologically, particularly in the connecting fibers that transmit information within the brain, and how closely this mirrors the pace of their mental development. The aim of the research is to increase our understanding of differences among children so that we can use this knowledge to create more supportive environments for all children, and also to guide us toward interventions that may help prevent behavioral disorders and mental illness. 

Substudies

Assessing the impact of Childhood martial arts Training through Imaging On pediatric Neurodevelopment (ACTION)

How does martial arts training influence the child's brain and the development of skills like language and attention? The Neurosciences Institute, UC San Diego, and the San Diego Youth Symphony have formed a new partnership to address these questions.To understand how martial arts training affects the structure of the brain, participants will be asked to lie still in an MRI scanner for up to one hour while watching a video. To understand how martial arts training affects cognition, participants will do simple computerized tasks. These sessions will occur at different points in their martial arts education.

Studying the Influence Music Practice Has On Neurodevelopment in Youth (SIMPHONY)

How does musical training influence the child's brain and the development of skills like language and attention? The Neurosciences Institute, UC San Diego, and the San Diego Youth Symphony have formed a new partnership to address these questions. To understand how music affects the structure of the brain, participants will be asked to lie still in an MRI scanner for up to one hour while watching a video. To understand how music affects cognition, participants will do simple computerized tasks. These sessions will occur at different points in their music education.

Supported By
National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, Grant #R01HD06141
San Diego Foundation, Blasker Science & Technology Grant #BLSK201252047
Grammy Foundation Grant

Contact
General information: Kevin Lou | krlou@ucsd.edu (858) 822-2148

Hablamos Español 858-534-9493

ACTION Study: actionstudy@ucsd.edu
SIMPHONY Study: simphony@ucsd.edu